Updates

News Release | Environment New Hampshire

Report: Solar energy per person grew 149 percent last year

Concord, NH – Per capita solar power capacity grew 149 percent in New Hampshire last year, according to a new report by Environment New Hampshire Research & Policy Center. The growth rate put the state 3rd in the country for solar power capacity per person added in 2014.

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Report | Environment New Hampshire

Lighting the Way

Solar energy is booming. In just the last three years, America’s solar photovoltaic capacity tripled. In 2014, a third of the United States’ new installed electric capacity came from solar power. And in three states – California, Hawaii, and Arizona – solar power now generates more than 5 percent of total electricity consumption.

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Report | Environment New Hampshire Research and Policy Center

Summer Fun Index

Clean water is at the heart of summertime fun for many New Hampshirites. We swim at a favorite creek, fish in a nearby river, sail or kayak on the lake, or simply hike along a beautiful stream. As the summer draws to a close, Environment New Hampshire Research & Policy Center’s second annual Summer Fun Index provides a numerical snapshot of people engaging in water activities.

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Blog Post

Clean water not green water | Russell Bassett

Last year at this time, the toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie caused nearly half a million people in and around Toledo, Ohio, to be without safe drinking water. Clean water from our taps is something that many of us take for granted, but if we don’t protect our water sources — like the residents of Toledo discovered — we won’t be able to take it for granted anymore.

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Report | Environment New Hampshire Research and Policy Center

Path to the Paris Climate Conference

Even without Congress, the federal executive branch and states are playing a major role in U.S. progress to address climate change. In the next decade, existing state policies and federal rules such as the Clean Power Plan will cut carbon pollution by 1.1 billion metric tons, or 27 percent from 2005 levels.

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